Return to Antikythera: Divers revisit wreck where ancient computer found

The Guardian
By Jo Marchant
2 October 2012


It took more than 100 years to work out from its corroded remains how the Antikythera mechanism worked. Video: New Scientist

Site where oldest computer lay for thousands of years may yield other treasures and even another Antikythera mechanism

In 1900, Greek sponge divers stumbled across “a pile of dead, naked women” on the seabed near the tiny island of Antikythera. It turned out the figures were not corpses but bronze and marble statues, part of a cargo of stolen Greek treasure that was lost when the Roman ship carrying them sank two thousand years ago on the island’s treacherous rocks.

It was the first marine wreck to be studied by archaeologists, and yielded the greatest haul of ancient treasure that had ever been found. Yet the salvage project – carried out in treacherous conditions with desperately crude equipment – was never completed. So this month, armed with the latest diving technology, scientists are going back.

Read more at TheGuardian…

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Jim Caldwell
Redondo Beach

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About jw60sea

Jim Caldwell has over 26 years of experience in the public safety sector in occupations ranging from professional ski patrol, and ocean lifeguard to firefighter. Jim has worked for the Redondo Beach Fire Department for the last 22 years holding successively higher positions of responsibility. For the last six years, Jim has held the rank of Engineer with responsibility for driving and operating the Department’s Engines and Tillered Aerial Ladder Truck. Throughout his career, he has shown a dedication not only to public safety but also community service.
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